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Casting a Small Net

The Scientist - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Scientists inject flexible, electronic mesh structures into mouse brains to track neurons in real time.
More from Nature, Live Science, Popular Science
Live Science - Ultra-Flexible Tech May Monitor the Brain
Nature / Elizabeth Gibney - Injectable brain implant spies on individual neurons
Popular Science / Alexandra Ossola - Injectable, Flexible Mesh Picks Up Activity In Mouse Brains

Fast-tracking precision medicine: Drug re-aimed to target diabetic kidney disease

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
It started out as a treatment for arthritis. But steered by science, it could become a first new approach in two decades for treating the damage that diabetes inflicts on the kidneys of millions of people.
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ScienceDaily - Fast-tracking precision medicine: Drug re-aimed to target diabetic kidney disease

Shifts in the Antibiotic Susceptibility, Serogroups, and Clonal Complexes of Neisseria meningitidis in Shanghai, China: A Time Trend Analysis of the Pre-Quinolone and Quinolone Eras

PLOS Blogs / Mingliang Chen et al. - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
by Mingliang Chen, Qinglan Guo, Ye Wang, Ying Zou, Gangyi Wang, Xi Zhang, Xiaogang Xu, Miao Zhao, Fupin Hu, Di Qu, Min Chen, Minggui Wang Background Fluoroquinolones have been used broadly since the end of the 1980s and have been recommended for Neisseria meningitidis prophylaxis since 2005 in Ch...

Virus evolution and human behavior shape global patterns of flu movement

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
The global movement patterns of all four seasonal influenza viruses are illustrated in research published today in the journal Nature, providing a detailed account of country-to-country virus spread over the last decade and revealing unexpected differences in circulation patterns between viruses....

Has Maternal Mortality Really Doubled in the U.S.?

ScienceNOW - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
Statistics have suggested a sharp increase in the number of American women dying as a complication of pregnancy since the late 1980s, but a closer look at the data hints that all is not as it seems

MERS In South Korea Is Bad News But It's Not Yet Time To Panic

NPR / Jason Beaubien - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Fears that Middle East respiratory syndrome could sweep through the region seem to be overblown. But researchers say there's still a lot they don't know about the potentially fatal virus.
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NPR / Elise Hu - South Korea Struggles To Contain Deadly MERS Virus' Spread
NPR / Elise Hu - Classes Canceled, 1,300 Quarantined In S. Korea's Scramble To Stop MERS

&#039;Superspreading event&#039; triggers MERS explosion in South Korea

Science Magazine - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Scientists are struggling to understand why one imported case led to so many new infections

What Is Sleep? Contest Winners Explain Science of Zzzz's

Live Science - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Five months ago, actor Alan Alda joined 11-year-olds around the world in asking scientists a seemingly simple question: What is sleep?

Podcast: Yeast with human genes, gender bias in science, and the impact of climate change on tea

Science Magazine - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
Listen to a roundup of some of our favorite stories from the week

Soy supplements don't improve asthma

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Despite previous findings suggesting a link between soy intake and decreased asthma severity, a new study from Northwestern Medicine and the American Lung Association Asthma Clinical Research Network shows soy supplements do not improve lung function for patients with asthma.
More from ScienceDaily
ScienceDaily - Soy supplements don't improve asthma, study concludes

Heart rate can indicate risk of diabetes, finds large-scale study

The Guardian / Press Association - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Faster resting heart rates are associated with increased risk of developing diabetes, finds study published in International Journal of Epidemiology Ads from Inoreader:Remove ads • Advertise with Inoreader
More from ScienceDaily, (e) Science News, Medical Xpress
(e) Science News - Faster heart rate linked to diabetes risk
Medical Xpress - Faster heart rate linked to diabetes risk
ScienceDaily - Faster heart rate linked to diabetes risk

Alzheimer’s origins tied to rise of human intelligence

Nature / Nala Rogers - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Factors that drove evolution of intellectual capacity also implicated in memory disorder.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2015.17589

Three important things you didn’t know about diabetes

PLOS Blogs / Alessandro Demaio, MBBS MPH PhD - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
This week, lead blogger Dr Alessandro Demaio of the Harvard Global Equity Initiative returns to lay things straight on a leading cause of global deaths. When we think of diabetes, we tend to think of rich people with poor lifestyles. … Continue reading » The post Three important things you did...
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PLOS Blogs / Alessandro Demaio, MBBS MPH PhD - Three important things you didn’t know about diabetes

After Ebola, a Blueprint Emerges to Jumpstart R&D

ScienceNOW - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Accelerated testing of compounds that have shown efficacy against the virus may lead to new drugs and vaccines Ads from Inoreader:Remove ads • Advertise with Inoreader
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ScienceNOW - After Ebola, a Blueprint Emerges to Jump-Start R&D

Researchers find that 'quality' diets high in fruits and vegetables, low in sodium are good for kidneys

Naturalnews.com / By Raw Michelle - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
(NaturalNews) Many health-minded people often question whether or not a medication prescribed to treat their condition will ultimately be helpful; it's not uncommon for many to wonder if the drugs will do more harm to their body than good. In many instances, people opt to avoid conventional...

Giant panda gut bacteria can't efficiently digest bamboo

Biology News Net - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
It's no wonder that giant pandas are always chewing and eating, say Chinese researchers: their gut bacteria are not the type for efficiently digesting bamboo.
More from Live Science
Live Science - Undigested Bamboo Showing Up in Panda Poop

Reproducibility crisis: Blame it on the antibodies

Nature / Monya Baker - - Reading time 11 mins - Share :
Antibodies are the workhorses of biological experiments, but they are littering the field with false findings. A few evangelists are pushing for change.Nature 521 274 doi: 10.1038/521274a

Critically endangered gibbon: New action plan to save world's rarest primate

ScienceDaily - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
An international team of more than 100 scientists, policy makers and community representatives have published a new report outlining the vital steps needed to save the Hainan gibbon (Nomascus hainanus) from extinction. With only 25 individuals remaining in less than 20 square kilometers of forest...

Universal flu vaccine closer to reality after Chinese-Australian scientific breakthrough

Telegraph / Nicola Davison - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Scientists in Australia and China have discovered how the body's "assassin" immunity cells memorise viruses, raising hopes for a life-long flu jabAds from Inoreader:Remove ads • Advertise with Inoreader
More from Medical Xpress
Medical Xpress - Memory code for flu-killing 'assassin' cells cracked in quest for one-shot flu 'jab' for life

Ringing ears light up the brain’s emotion center

Futurity / Bert Gambini-Buffalo - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
People with tinnitus “hear” ringing, buzzing, or hissing in their ears much like an amputee might “feel” pain in a missing limb. While exposure to loud noise may contribute, some cases have no apparent trigger. Though it’s not known yet exactly where and how tinnitus occurs in the brai...
More from ScienceDaily, Medical Xpress
Medical Xpress - Breakthrough in tinnitus research could lead to testable model
ScienceDaily - Breakthrough in tinnitus research could lead to testable model
ScienceDaily - Breakthrough in tinnitus research could lead to testable model

Embryo engineering 'a moral duty'

BBC - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
It would be unethical and a "sin of omission" to prevent the genetic engineering of embryos, a leading scientist has argued.Ads from Inoreader:Remove ads • Advertise with Inoreader

Tea Tuesdays: Matcha-maker, Matcha-maker, Make Me Some Tea

NPR / Laurel Dalrymple - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
Matcha green tea is taking off in America, but the Japanese have been drinking it for eight centuries. What happens when commercialism meets tradition?
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NPR / Laurel Dalrymple - Tea Tuesdays: Matcha-maker, Matcha-maker, Make Me Some Tea

E-skin and pocket-sized diagnostic devices give patients the power back

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Wearable E-skin that can measure heart rate and blood pressure, and paper diagnostic machines the size of a credit card that can give instant readings on blood and saliva samples are two new bio-sensing technologies. Bio-sensors can detect and analyze data to give patients information on their he...

GMO beef with the heart benefits of fish, why not?

Loonylabs.org / Dr. Jekyll, Lunatic Laboratories - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Sometimes you just want beef, but beef is high in omega-6 fatty acids and low in the omega-3 type. Conversely, different types of fish are high in omega-3, but we all know they don’t compare to that tasty burger flavor. So what’s a beef lover to do, well if you’re in China you might have [...
More from ScienceDaily
ScienceDaily - First beef with the goodness of fish

Global health leaders call for global biomedical R&D fund, mechanism

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
World leaders should consider the establishment of a global biomedical research and development fund and a mechanism to address the dearth in innovation for today's most pressing global health challenges, according global health leaders.

Dissecting the ocean's unseen waves to learn where the heat, energy and nutrients go

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
The first 'cradle-to-grave' model of internal waves, which are subsurface ocean displacements recognized as essential to the distribution of nutrients and heat, has been published by scientists. The researchers modeled the internal waves that move through the Luzon Strait between southern Taiwan ...

New index reveals unexpected leaders in water, sanitation progress

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
A new index shows which countries are leaders in improving access to water and sanitation for their citizens. Sub-Saharan Africa countries including Mali, South Africa, and Ethiopia are also among the top performers world-wide in spite of modest resources.

Scientists find hyped new recreational drug 'Flakka' is as addictive as bath salts

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found using animal models that the new recreational drug alpha-PVP ("flakka") seems equivalently potent as a stimulant, and therefore as addictive, as its chemical cousin MDPV ("bath salts").
More from ScienceDaily
ScienceDaily - Hyped new recreational drug 'flakka' is as addictive as 'bath salts'

Search and rescue tool that pinpoints buried victims developed

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
A new locator feature on a search and rescue tool can pinpoint the location of a victim to within about five feet – saving rescuers time and increasing chances for locating survivors.

New form of DNA modification may carry inheritable information

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
The surprising discovery and function of a new DNA modification in insects, worms, and algae has been described in a new article by an international team of researchers.
More from The Scientist
The Scientist - New Epigenetic Mark Found on Metazoan DNA
The Scientist - New Epigenetic Mark found on Metazoan DNA

Ecologist warns of bamboo fueling spread of hantavirus

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
The popularity of bamboo landscaping could increase the spread of hantavirus, researchers say, with the plant's prolific seed production creating a population boom among seed-eating deer mice that carry the disease.

Children sleep better when they have a nightly bedtime routine

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Having a regular bedtime routine is associated with better sleep in young children up to six years of age, and the positive impact on sleep increases with the consistency of the nightly routine, a multinational study suggests.

GlaxoSmithKline scraps float plans for HIV business

The Guardian / Julia Kollewe and Sean Farrell - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Drugmaker decides to retain ViiV Healthcare as part of a plan to revive performance and boost growth in emerging markets
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The Guardian / Julia Kollewe and Sean Farrell - GlaxoSmithKline scraps float plans for HIV business

Researcher develops bird flu vaccine using virus commonly found in dogs

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Researchers at the University of Georgia have used a virus commonly found in dogs as the foundation for a new vaccine against H7N9 influenza, more commonly known as bird flu.

Monsanto gets sued for falsely advertising glyphosate as non-toxic to humans

Naturalnews.com / By L.J. Devon, Staff Writer - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
(NaturalNews) A class action lawsuit coming out of California could deal another hard blow to the infamous Monsanto Corporation. The lawsuit is pointing out what - that glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup, is killing not only plants but also targeting specific...

Tea Tuesdays: Butter Up That Tea, Tibetan-Style

NPR / Tove Danovich - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Yak butter tea is often referred to as the national drink of Tibet. It's been consumed in the Himalayas for centuries and helped inspire the Bulletproof Coffee craze in the U.S.

Countering a tide of anti-vaccine sentiment

Nature / Boer Deng - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
GAVI chief executive Seth Berkley explains the challenges of supporting immunization in the world's neediest countries.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2015.17372

What happens at a slapping workshop?

BBC - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
The BBC takes a look at the controversial methods touted by Xiao Hongchi, founder of the slapping and stretching "self-healing" method known as paida lajin.

Urine For A Surprise: Your Pee Might Reveal Your Risk For Obesity

NPR / Poncie Rutsch - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
There are clues about your activity level and metabolism in urine. Researchers hope to one day predict obesity risk by tracking the different levels and ratios of certain molecules in pee.Ads from Inoreader:Remove ads • Advertise with Inoreader
More from ScienceDaily, Medical Xpress
Medical Xpress - Urine profiles provide clues to how obesity causes disease
Medical Xpress - Coming soon: A test to gauge your obesity risk?
ScienceDaily - Urine profiles provide clues to how obesity causes disease

Did dinosaur-killing asteroid trigger largest lava flows on Earth?

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
The theory that an asteroid impact killed off the dinosaurs 66 million years ago is well accepted, but one puzzle is why another global catastrophe -- the huge, million-year eruption of the Deccan Traps flood basalts in India -- occurred at the same time. Geologists now argue this is not a coinci...

New research offers the potential of new treatments for toxoplasma-induced pneumonia and cystic fibrosis

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
The research has discovered a link between a vital pumping system that does not function correctly in people with cystic fibrosis and the parasite Toxoplasma.Ads from Inoreader:Remove ads • Advertise with Inoreader
More from ScienceDaily
ScienceDaily - Potential new treatments for Toxoplasma-induced pneumonia and cystic fibrosis